A comparison of the paintings guernica and les demoiselles by picasso

In this painting, Picasso abandoned all known form and representation of traditional art. He used distortion of female's body and geometric forms in an innovative way, which challenge the expectation that paintings will offer idealized representations of female beauty. It also shows the influence of African art on Picasso. This painting is a large work and took nine months to complete.

A comparison of the paintings guernica and les demoiselles by picasso

Les Demoiselles d'Avignon by Picasso (article) | Khan Academy

Five naked female figures were depicted from different angles, filling almost the entire surface of the canvas as it was roughly carved from solid wood or stone.

Bodies in the oil painting are very generalized and deprived of expression. Draperies, forming background of the picture, create a sense of decay and disharmony.

This painting is not very clear cubist theme; however, it was started in the early cubism period of great painter. It combines the elements of realistic cubism and produces an effect of classical art.

The story of these models is the impression of extreme tension. It is a logical starting point in the history of Cubism. In light of the events of the personal life of the artist, the picture is a quintessence of his inner state at a peculiar time of life, therefore, it is possible to see the irony in the name of the creation.

However, analytical genius of Picasso takes it further away from realism. With each thumbnail, a plot of the picture disappears, and it becomes filled with quite different, mystical meaning.

The first public reaction was shock, however, it was the first step to Cubism on the way of painting, and many critics consider it the starting point of modern art.

A comparison of the paintings guernica and les demoiselles by picasso

Beginning fromthe image of a bull, the Minotaur, is a key issue for Picasso and his creations. The artist creates a series of works with this character and interprets the myth of the Minotaur differently.

For Picasso, the Minotaur is a destructive force, symbol of war and death. Guernica is a small Basque town in northern Spain, almost razed to the ground by German aircraft on the first of May, This huge, almost eight feet long and three and a half in height monochrome, that is black, white and gray picture, was first exhibited in Paris.

#10 Family of Saltimbanques

The plot of a huge mural was born according to a true story, which unravels the tragedy of Guernica, an ancient town near Bilbao.

The worst thing in this event is that the city was not military objective. The attack was just a terrible act of intimidation for others. Guernica was not only supported by the Republican government, it was a sacred city for the Basque people.

The world, not knowing Hiroshima yet, was horrified. Picasso worked at a fast pace, a huge mural was written almost in a month. People can see here no planes, no houses, no explosions, and no debris. It seems that there is not even a story: Picasso created a scene of universal sound, and it is higher than a specific scene and event particulars.

In his sketches, Picasso identified main elements of the painting: Horse and bull are traditional figures for Picasso; from his childhood, the artist knew that bullfighting was the same as death.

Rivalry with Henri Matisse

Apparently, the grief of all mothers is the expression of terrible despair. The hand of a warrior with a sword is a fragment that serves as an allegorical reminder of resistance, the will to win. The image of a dying horse with eyes wild with pain is the embodiment of the physical suffering.

The image of the bull symbolizes evil, soullessness and power, which is indifferent to good.

Les Demoiselles d'Avignon by Pablo Picasso

Indifference turns into curse, which approaches to the meaning of fascism. A woman with a lamp is an allegory of humanity, beauty and goodness, a symbol of mind.

A woman with a candle appears here as if from another world or another time, and cannot change anything. Picasso saw the devastation of a small town as a fast approach of a period of mass destruction, the era of gas chambers and atomic bombs.Read and learn for free about the following article: Picasso, Guernica Picasso, Les Demoiselles d'Avignon.

Picasso, Les Demoiselles d'Avignon. Braque, The Viaduct at L'Estaque And although the size and multiple figures reference the long tradition of European history paintings, this painting is different because it challenges rather.

A comparison of the paintings guernica and les demoiselles by picasso

Among his most famous works are the proto-Cubist Les Demoiselles d'Avignon (), and Guernica (), a dramatic portrayal of the bombing of Guernica by the German and Italian airforces during the Spanish Civil War. When comparing the two paintings “Guernica” and “Les Demoiselles” by Picasso, there are several distinctly noticeable differences.

Notably, the most distinct difference between the two paintings is Picasso’s use of color in “Les Demoiselles” as opposed to the predominant use of black and white in the painting “Guernica”.

Essay Guernica by Pablo Picasso - Guernica by Pablo Picasso In , Pablo Picasso painted Guernica, oil on canvas. The Republican Spanish government commissioned the mural for the World Fair in Paris.

Guernica is a large mural, twenty-six feet wide and eleven feet tall, and was placed at the entrance to Spain’s pavilion. - Guernica by Pablo Picasso In , Pablo Picasso painted Guernica, oil on canvas. The Republican Spanish government commissioned the mural for the World Fair in Paris.

Guernica is a large mural, twenty-six feet wide and eleven feet tall, and was placed at the entrance to Spain’s pavilion. Les Demoiselles d'Avignon (The Young Ladies of Avignon, and originally titled The Brothel of Avignon) is a large oil painting created in by the Spanish artist Pablo initiativeblog.com work, part of the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art, portrays five nude female prostitutes from a brothel on Carrer d'Avinyó (Avignon Street) in Barcelona.

Modern Art (–50) | Art History Teaching Resources